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ELA G6:M1:U1:L11

Selecting Evidence: “The Hero’s Journey” and The Lightning Thief (Chapter 6)

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We updated this lesson in June 2014 based on teacher feedback. We recommend that you reprint this lesson if you previously downloaded it. To see the specific aspects of this lesson that were updated, please refer to the update summary.

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can get the gist of an excerpt from The Lightning Thief.
  • I can answer questions using evidence about an excerpt from The Lightning Thief.
  • I can select evidence from both The Lightning Thief and “The Hero’s Journey” that shows how Percy is on a hero’s journey.
  • Text-Dependent Questions
  • Selecting Evidence graphic organizer
  • Exit Ticket: Reflecting on Learning Targets

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Read-Aloud of Quote from Chapter 6 (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Close Read: Percy Explores Camp Half-Blood (15 minutes)

B.  Triad Collaboration to Choose Evidence: Connecting Percy’s Experience with “The Hero’s Journey” (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Exit Ticket: Reflecting on the Learning Targets (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  First draft read of Chapter 7, “My Dinner Goes Up in Smoke”

  • This lesson continues the series of lessons scaffolding students toward writing with evidence.
  • The text-dependent questions for the close-reading excerpt intentionally scaffold students toward finding appropriate evidence when connecting Percy’s experience to “The Hero’s Journey.”
  • Students again briefly review the “Things Close Readers Do” anchor chart (during Opening, Part B). Hold on to this chart. In Unit 2, students work with a resource that gives them even more details about close reading, and will refer back to the chart they helped to build.

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

gist, excerpt, evidence, archetype, align; cloven (77), pursue (78), pavilion (79), centaur (82), caduceus (83), patron (85)

 

  • Things Close Readers Do anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Equity sticks
  • Sticky notes (3–4 for each student)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Excerpt from Chapter 6, “I Become Supreme Lord of the Bathroom” (one per student)
  • Evidence flags (3–4 for each student)
  • Selecting Evidence: Percy Jackson and “The Hero’s Journey” graphic organizer (for Chapter 6) (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Reflecting on the Learning Targets (one per student)
  • Homework: Purpose for Reading—Chapter 7 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Read-Aloud of Quote from Chapter 6 (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to open their text of The Lightning Thief to page 86. Remind students of the meaning of the word archetype from Lesson 8: a character or a story line that repeats again and again over time. Ask students to read along as your read aloud from “I shook my head …” to “Chiron calls them archetypes. Eventually, they re-form.”
  • Think-Pair-Share:

*   “How is the meaning of archetype that we learned connected to this idea of the minotaur as an archetype?”

  • Listen for answers like: “Just like the same characters and stories keep showing up, monsters like the minotaur keep showing up, even when you kill them.”
  • Some students may benefit from being given sentence starters for Think-Pair-Share. For example: “I think the minotaur is an archetype because_____,” or “Base on our learning targets, I think we will be __________ today.”

 

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to read along as you read the learning targets

*   “I can get the gist of an excerpt from The Lightning Thief.”

*   “I can answer questions using evidence about an excerpt from The Lightning Thief.”

*   “I can select evidence from both The Lightning Thief and ‘The Hero’s Journey’ that shows how Percy is on a hero’s journey.”

  • Think-Pair-Share: “Based on today’s learning targets, what do you think we will be doing in today’s lesson?” Listen for responses like: “We will be closely reading parts of The Lightning Thief” and “We will be trying to make a connection between Percy and ‘The Hero’s Journey.’” Listen for students to refer to evidence, and point out that they will be rereading both texts to identify how they connect.
  • Briefly review the Things Close Readers Do anchor chart (from previous lessons). Invite students to read the bullets aloud. Emphasize the the heart of close reading is paying careful attention to the actual words in the text: that is why “evidence” is so important.

C. Connecting “The Hero’s Journey” and The Lightning Thief: A Carousel of Quotes (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to work in their triads for this part of the lesson. Tell student that a very important reading skill they will be using, now and many times in their future reading lives, is to make connections and describe the relationship between two texts. It’s almost like thinking about how two texts “talk to each other.” Tell students that this is something they probably do without realizing it, but today they will think about these connections, talk about them, and write about them.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

*   “When you think about The Lightning Thief and ‘The Hero’s Journey,’ how do think these two texts are related?”

  • Listen for answers like: “Maybe they are related because Percy is a hero” or “They are related because Percy is going to go on a journey.” Confirm similar initial comments.
  • Tell students that you have selected quotes from both The Lightning Thief and “The Hero’s Journey” to help them think more about the relationship between the two texts. Using chart paper or a document camera, show students the first set of connected quotes: “I have dyslexia and attention deficit disorder and I had never made above a C- in my life” and “Heroes possess some ability or characteristic that makes them feel out-of-place.”
  • Think-Pair-Share:

*   “What is the relationship between these two quotes?” Listen for answers like: “These quotes are related because Percy’s has characteristics that make him feel out of place, and this is a challenge many heroes face.”

  • Distribute the Carousel of Quotes: Connecting The Lightning Thief and ‘The Hero’s Journey’ recording form. Tell students they will have a few minutes to silently read these quotes, think about them, and jot down their initial ideas about the relationships between them. Circulate and support students as they work. 
  • For students needing additional supports, you may want to consider using the Carousel of Quotes: Connecting The Lightning Thief and “The Hero’s Journey” recording form (more scaffolded version) in the supporting materials of this lesson. This version has key words highlighted to support students in making connections between quotes.
  • For students who struggle with following multiple-step directions, consider displaying these directions using a document camera or Smartboard. Another option is to type up these instructions for students to have in hand.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read: Percy Explores Camp Half-Blood (pages 78–82) (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that they will be closely reading an excerpt from The Lightning Thief, Chapter 6, “I Become Supreme Lord of the Bathroom.” Direct students’ attention to the Things Close Readers Do anchor chart. Ask:

*   “What does it mean to closely read a text? How do you start? What do you do next?”

  • Using equity sticks, invite whole class shares. Listen for responses like: “First you just read for the flow, to get to know the text,” “You read to get the gist and choose unfamiliar words,” “You choose important details,” and “You read to answer questions about the text.”
  • Distribute sticky notes to each student. Remind students that they have already read to get the flow of the text during their “first draft” reading for homework.
  • Invite student to open The Lightning Thief to page 78. Give directions:
  1. Read from the bottom of page 78 starting with “As we got closer …” to page 82 “… Annabeth is waiting for us.”
  2. Stop every few paragraphs and write the gist on a sticky note and place it in your book.
  • Circulate and support students in their reading. Ask students to rehearse saying the gist of a section aloud before writing it on a sticky note. Practicing verbally allows students to get immediate feedback.
  • After 5 minutes, ask students to stop and share their gist writing with their triads.
  • Distribute Text-Dependent Questions: Excerpt from Chapter 6, “I Become Supreme Lord of the Bathroom.” Tell students that answering questions, and using evidence in their answers, is an important step in reading something closely because it draws their attention to parts of the text that they may have missed. Give directions:
  1. Read the questions so you know what to look for when you reread.
  2. Reread the passage, keeping the questions in mind.
  3. Use an evidence flag to mark places in the text connected to one of the questions.
  4. Answer the questions on your graphic organizer. Be sure to use evidence to support your answer.
  • Give students 10 minutes to work on their own.
  • Then prompt students to share their answers and evidence with their triad.
  • Encourage students who are having difficulty with the text to stop and write the gist for smaller sections of text. Continue to emphasize that getting the gist is just a very first pass to get a general sense of the text; it’s fine if students are confused or wrong.
  • Consider partnering ELL students who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.
  • Consider pulling small groups of students who need additional support and work with them in a more guided setting.

B. Triad Collaboration to Choose Evidence: Connecting Percy’s Experience with “The Hero’s  Journey”    (15 minutes)

  • Distribute the Selecting Evidence: Percy Jackson and “The Hero’s Journey” graphic organizer (Chapter 6) to each student. Tell students that they are going to continue the very important work they have begun to make the connection between Percy’s experiences in The Lightning Thief and the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey—a story structure that has been repeated across countless stories over time. They read about that archetypal journey in the article “The Hero’s Journey.” But today, instead of being given the evidence, their triad will work as reading detectives, on the hunt for evidence!
  • Tell students that in the passage they just read closely, there are multiple examples of Percy being on a hero’s journey. Give and post directions:
  1. On your graphic organizer, I have included which stages of “The Hero’s Journey” show up in the passage of The Lightning Thief you read closely.
  2. Review these section in “The Hero’s Journey” to remind yourself what happens in each of those stages.
  3. Think: “In the passage from The Lightning Thief that we just read closely, how does this stage of the hero’s journey show up?”
  4. Go back to the passage in Chapter 6 of The Lightning Thief and choose a specific scene that shows Percy experiencing that stage in “the hero’s journey.”
  5. Go back to “The Hero’s Journey” and choose a quote that clearly connects to Percy’s experience.
  • Tell students that they should work with the other members of their triads to complete their work.
  • Consider providing a partially filled-in chart (i.e., with page numbers) to those who need additional support.
  • For students who struggle with following multiple-step directions, consider displaying these directions using a document camera or Smartboard. Another option is to type up these instructions for students to have in hand.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Reflecting on the Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Distribute Exit Ticket: Reflecting on the Learning Targets to each student. Tell students that selecting connecting evidence from two texts was a new challenge for them, and you are curious about how they felt doing this task. Explain the 1–5 rating system they will be using, where 1 represents very easy and 5 represents very challenging.
  • Give students 5 minutes to quietly reflect in writing on today’s learning target.
  • Consider having students who struggle with on-demand writing to talk with a partner before they respond in writing to the question.

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Do a “first draft” read of Chapter 7, “My Dinner Goes Up in Smoke.” Use the Homework: Purpose for Reading—Chapter 7 question to focus your reading and use your evidence flags to mark the specific areas in the book that support your answer.

Note: Review students’ graphic organizers from this lesson as a formative assessment. This activity is building toward the End of Unit Assessment in Lesson 10, so it is important to see where students are experiencing difficulty.